The Top 5 Things To Do In Hawaii

Of all the states that make up the United States of America, it’s often said that Alaska ‘feels’ like it doesn’t belong with the rest of them, because it’s so different. We disagree with that assessment. Alaska is just cold. If you want to find a completely different culture to the rest of the USA without (technically) leaving the USA, then you should go to Hawaii.

As well as being the birthplace of President Barack Obama (yes, Donald, that birth certificate was real), Hawaii is home to scenery that rivals anything that can be found on the American mainland, and a culture all of its own. Thanks to the way it’s sometimes been depicted in fiction, for example, in mobile slots like ‘Aloha,’ people tend to have the stereotype in their heads that Hawaii is all about leis, grass skirts, and hula dancing. This is why you should never take facts from mobile slots games! Playing slot games, you might pay out to you in terms of cash, but never in terms of global wisdom. Although all the things we just mentioned are elements of Hawaiian culture, there’s much more to the islands than just that.

Because we think that Hawaii doesn’t always get its dues as a potential vacation destination (and also because we’re approaching winter and we’re dreaming of glamorous vacations), here’s our take on the top five things you can do in Hawaii as a tourist.

Learn Surfing

You’re in one of the best surfing locations anywhere on the planet. If you head down to the beaches, you’ll be surrounded by surfers in every direction. As the saying goes, ‘when in Rome, do as the Romans do.’ You’re not in Rome, though, you’re in Hawaii – and the Hawaiians are surfing. It would almost be rude not to try your hand (or foot) at it yourself. If you already have a little surfing experience, you could try your hand at the legendary Sunset Beach on the North Shore of Oahu and see if you’re up to the challenge. If you’re a complete rookie at riding a board on the water, though, head on over to Kahaluu Bay, which is in Kona. Teams of surf instructors are on hand there every day of the week to teach tourists how to surf. Don’t worry – they expect you to be a beginner when you come to them, and they won’t laugh at you when you wipe out.

Visit The Volcanoes

As everybody knows, volcanoes are among the most dangerous natural threats on the face of the planet. It therefore probably sounds like strange advice to suggest that you should go and take a closer look at on. It probably sounds even stranger that we’re advising you to go and peer at the most active volcano in the world, but that’s what we’re doing. Hawaii is practically made of volcanoes. Five of them are still considered to be active, and four of those active exploding mountains are on the imaginatively-named Big Island. All of them are worth seeing, but the highlight of any visit to the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park the Crater Rim Drive, which is an eleven-mile road trip around the outside of Kilauea – a volcano which is erupting right now, and has been erupting ever since 1983. If you’re feeling a little braver, head all the way down to the bottom of Chain of Craters Road, and watch as boiling hot lava flows out into the sea.

Go Whale Spotting

You’ll have to get your timing right if you want to see the whales, but they’re worth the extra scheduling work. If you visit Hawaii during the first three months of the year, you have a strong chance of watching magnificent humpback whales playing in the ocean. They sing to each other, splash each other, and leap out of the water as they do so, and it’s one of the most breathtaking sights nature provides in the sea. The whales – which arrive in their thousands – migrate to Hawaii from Alaska at this time of year to mate. Hawaii is one of the few places in the world where whale numbers are increasing rather than dropping, and that’s because the locals care for their conservation. So will you, once you’ve seen them.

Climb Haleakala

A good vacation shouldn’t all be about lounging on the beach with a cocktail in your hand – that should only cover 75% of it! For the remaining 25%, think about getting some physical activity done. What better form of physical activity could there be than climbing a mountain that offers a stunning panoramic view at its summit? Head to Maui Nui, and you’ll find Haleakala waiting for you. This is yet another Hawaiian volcano, although this one is at least dormant. It’s 10,023 feet to the summit. If you really can’t face the thought of climbing, then drive up the mountain and get to the top anyway. If you’re going by car, though, you’ll have to book a reservation to ensure there will be space for your vehicle. The best time to go is at 04.30 am. We know that’s earlier than you’d normally wake up – so why not make it the last thing you do before you go to bed? The sunrise is worth every fatigued second of the wait and the drive, we promise.

Get In Touch With Nature On Molokini

Unusually for Hawaii, Molokini isn’t a volcano. It’s not a million miles away from being one, though; it’s a volcanic crater. It’s a tiny island, but it’s also a protected marine live conservation area. There are restrictions on what you can and can’t do here, because keeping the sea life and the birds safe is the number one priority of the conservation workers, but you’re allowed to come and look at them. In fact, many local catamaran services will offer you a journey for that specific purpose. The waters here all full of reefs, and so the area attracts hundreds of divers and snorkelers. Amateur snorkelers are welcome so long as they’re with a guide, and so you’ll be able to enjoy the varied and colorful range of tropical fish as you gaze into the perfectly clear waters. Say hello to the turtles when you get back to the shore – they’ve been known to come close to humans in the hope of being fed. As a top tip, they really love watermelon – just in case you happen to have any on your person! That’s five things you can do in Hawaii which don’t involve any of the popular stereotypes we mentioned earlier – but there’s nothing to say you can’t indulge in them in the evenings. Just don’t do it to the point where you’re too tired to take that morning trek up Haleakala!

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